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Augustus Wendell

Augustus Wendell

Augustus Wendell

Assistant Professor of the Practice, Computational Media
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Augustus Wendell, Assistant Professor of the Practice, researches the application of digital spatial modeling and analysis in historical studies. He brings several decades of experience in the modeling and simulation of complex spaces to the lab. On the Building Duke project he is working with students on the creation and programming of an interactive 3D model of the Duke University historical development. Both Deconstructing Urban Visions: Computational Analysis of Aerial Engravings and Modeling Agency: Historical Agent Based Modeling feature the ongoing development of originally programmed 3D spatial analysis tools. Augustus enjoys overlapping the orbit of computational humanist inquiry with students of Computer Science and Mathematics. He has an MFA in Computer Art from The School of Visual Arts and a BS from Northeastern University. Augustus has also held appointments at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, Parsons the New School for Design, The New York School of Interior Design and Virginia Tech.

Scholarship

Articles

  • Wendell, Augustus, Ozludil, Burcak and López-Salas, Estefanía. “Calculating Movement – An Agent Based Modeling System for Historical Studies”, Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution – Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference – Volume 1, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 541-550.

Presentations

  • Wendell, Augustus; Ozludil, Burcak. “Agent-Based Modeling in Art History: Simulating an Insane Asylum” Digital Humanities 2019 Conference, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  • Wendell, Augustus; Ozludil, Burcak. “Living Beings and Movement in Historical Space: Opportunities in Agent-based Modeling” CAA 2020 Conference, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

John Taormina

John J. Taormina

John J. Taormina

Curator of Visual Resources, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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John J. Taormina received his BA in Art History from John Carroll University and MA in Art History from George Washington University. From 1982-1999, he was head of the visual resources/image collections at George Washington University, Oberlin College, The Ohio State University, and the University of Michigan. Since 2000 Taormina has been the curator of visual resources in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke. As the head of the Visual Media Lab at Duke, he oversees all aspects of the extensive digital and analog image collections. He also manages the department’s communication program and the department’s exhibition spaces in Smith Warehouse.

Taormina served for ten years as editor of the VRA Bulletin, the professional journal of the Visual Resources Association (VRA), the international organization of image media professionals, and served on the VRA Executive Board for seven years. In 2005 he received both the Distinguished Service Award and the Nancy DeLaurier Achievement Award from the Visual Resources Association.

Taormina has been the metadata and image consultant to the Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database project since its inception in 2011. In 2015, he co-organized with Caroline Bruzelius the Wired! symposium, “Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies.” Since 2018, he has been part of the Building Duke Bass Connections project team. After three years of research, John published his 150-page Digital Humanities Bibliography in 2019, with ongoing revisions and additions.

Scholarship

Publications

  • Taormina, John J. VRA Bulletin. Guest Editor, special issue on “Digital Humanities and the Visual,” (44:2, Winter 2016).
  • Taormina, John J. Review: Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp, Digital _Humanities (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012) in VRA Bulletin 43:2 (Winter 2016).
  • Taormina, John J. VRA Bulletin, Guest Editor, special issue on “New Directions, New Challenges,” (37:2, Summer 2010).
  • Taormina, John J. VRA Bulletin, Guest Editor, special issue on “Digital Collaborations,” (35:2, Summer 2008).

Public-Facing Scholarship

Presentations

  • Bruzelius, Caroline, William Broom, and John Taormina. “The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database Project: From Conceptual Design to Management.” Paper presented at Digital Matters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 6-7, 2018.
  • Taormina, John J. “Project Creation: Making Concept into Reality,” in The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database Project: From Conceptual Design to Management. Symposium on Digital matters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Duke University, April 2018.
  • Taormina, John J. “Reconfiguring Knowledge: Making the Digital Humanities Visual.” Session Organizer and Moderator. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, October 2015.
  • Taormina, John J. Digital Humanities Special Interest Group. Co-organizer and Co-moderator. Visual Resources Association annual conference, Denver, Co, March 2015.
  • Taormina, John J. “Cultural Heritage in a Computational Environment: Making the Digital Humanities Visual.” Session Co-organizer and Co-moderator. Visual Resources Association annual conference, Denver, Co, March 2015.
  • Taormina, John J. and Jenni Rodda. “Cultural Heritage in a Computational Environment: Making the Digital Humanities Visual.” Session organized at the Annual meeting of the Visual Resources Association, Denver, CO, March 2015.
  • Taormina, John J. “The Politics of Change: Digital Humanities and the Visual Arts.” Session organizer. Art Libraries Society of North America annual conference. March 2014. Washington, DC.
  • Taormina, John J. “Digital Technologies and the Visual Arts: Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital Age.” Paper presented as part of the panel “Making the Digital Humanities Visual: Opportunities and Case Studies” at the Annual meeting of the Visual Resources Association, Providence, RI, April 2013.
  • Taormina, John J., and Mark Pompelia. “Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities.” Session organized at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference, Greensboro, NC, October 2013.
  • Taormina, John J., and Mark Pompelia. “Enhancing Education Beyond the Classroom Experience via Digital Technologies.” Session organized at the Annual meeting of the Visual Resources Association, Providence, RI, April 2013.
  • Taormina, John J., and Mark Pompelia. “When the Past Collides with the Present: Moving Beyond the Single Classroom Experience via Digital Technologies.” Session organized at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference, Durham, NC, October 2012.

Lee Sorensen

Lee Sorensen

Lee Sorensen

Librarian for Visual Studies and Dance, Duke University Libraries
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Lee Sorensen received his graduate degrees in art history and library science both from The University of Chicago. Together with the late Lawrence Clark Powell he co-authored Determined Donor: T. Edward Hanley (University of Arizona, 1989). His articles include “Art Bibliographies: A Survey of their Development, 1595-1821” Library Quarterly (1986) and the entries on “Art Catalogs and Cataloging” (1996) and “Art Dealers” (2017) in the online Grove Dictionary of Art/Oxford Art Online, Oxford University Press. His essay on special collections in art libraries appeared in the Handbook of Art Libraries (2018). He served as the consultant for art historians for the Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography (1994). Professionally he served twice on the executive board of the Art Libraries Society of North America as well as that society’s web administrator for a similar time. For more than a score of years he has been art reference librarian and bibliographer at Duke University. He currently serves on the advisory board for Oxford University Press’ Oxford Art Online.

Scholarship

Public-Facing Scholarship

Presentations

  • Sorensen, Lee, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Updates from the Dictionary of Art Historians.” Presentation at the Art Historians’ Archives Workshop, Getty Research Institute, January 28, 2019.
  • Sorensen, Lee. “The Dictionary of Art Historians: Relaunching a Research Tool.” Getty Research Portal, Art Libraries Society of North America, March 26, 2019.
  • Sorensen, Lee and Arnetta Girodeaux. “Image Acquisition and Copyright for Use in Scholarship.” Responsible Conduct of Research, Duke University Graduate School, February 26, 2018.
  • Sorensen, Lee. “Digital Image Research: Criteria and Acquisition for Scholars.” Triangle Research Libraries Network Conference, January 16th, 2017.

Mark Olson

Mark J. V. Olson

Mark J. V. Olson

Assistant Professor of the Practice of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Mark J. V. Olson is Associate Professor of the Practice of Visual & Media Studies at Duke University and a founding member of the Wired! Lab. His research and teaching focus on the historical and contemporary entanglements of medical practice and media technologies, as well as on the affordances of emerging technologies for the analysis and exhibition of historical material culture. He is currently collaborating with the Nasher Museum of Art on expanding their engagements with interactive media and developing an infrastructure for constructing immersive virtual exhibition experiences. He also collaborates with Duke’s History of Medicine Collection and Department of Radiology on the micro-CT scanning and digital reconstruction of Duke’s ivory manikin collection.

More broadly, Olson is interested in cultivating literacies in “critical making”—drawing on the critical and analytic repertoires of the theoretical and historical humanities while cultivating a deep understanding of and proficient practice with computational media, from code to circuit design to photogrammetry. A longtime contributor to the field of digital humanities, Olson is the former Director of New Media & Information Technologies for HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Sciences & Technology Advanced Collaboratory) and the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary & International Studies. He received his MA and PhD in Communication Studies and graduate certificate in Cultural Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Current Collaborations

Building Duke

Scholarship

Books & Book Chapters

  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Hacking the Humanities: 21st Century Literacies and the ‘Becoming-Other’ of the Humanities.” In Humanities in the Twenty-First Century: Beyond Utility and Markets, edited by E. Belfiore and A. Upchurch. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. doi:10.1057/9781137361356.

Public-Facing Scholarship

  • Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J. V. Olson, Guillermo Sapiro, Mariano Tepper. The Lives of Things. Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Fall 2015.
  • McHugh, Julia, and Mark J. V. Olson. Art of the Americas Interactive. Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Winter 2020.

Articles

  • Jaskot, Paul B., Hannah L. Jacobs, Mark Olson, Victoria Szabo, and Edward Triplett. “Shaping the Discipline of Digital Art History: A recap of an advanced summer institute on 3-D and (geo)spatial networks.” The Iris. December 19, 2018. http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/shaping-the-discipline-of-digital-art-history/.
  • Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman, Mark James-Vrooman Olson, and Victoria E. Szabo. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015): Article 3.

Presentations

  • Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J. V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Panel presentation at “Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City,” Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, Florence, Italy, June 17, 2013.
  • Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J. V. Olson, Guillermo Sapiro, Mariano Tepper. “The Lives of Things.” Paper presented at NED Talk, Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, Durham, NC, October 4, 2015.
  • Dillon, Sheila, Mark J. V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials,” Paper presented at C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, February 17, 2010.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. “Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks.” Panel presentations at the College Art Association Conference, New York, NY, February 13, 2019.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. Presentation at “Coding Our Collection: Datathon,” National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, October 25, 2019.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Digital Museums, Archives, and Publications.” Panel moderated at the C.H.A.T. Festival 2012: Digital Arts + Humanities, Duke University, Durham, NC, February 7, 2012.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “What is the Wired Lab? – Opportunities for Undergraduates.” Presentation at the First Year Advisors Meeting, Duke University, Durham, NC, September 18, 2012.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Toward a Process Ontology for Digital Archives.” Keynote presented at the North Carolina Preservation Consortium Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, November 2, 2012.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Digital Technologies and the Social Life of Things: The Wired Lab at Duke University.” Presentation as part of the panel “Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities” at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference. Greensboro, NC, November 1, 2013.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Mapping Space & Time – Configuring Connections, Trade & Travel, Past & Present.” Roundtable moderated at the National Humanities Center, Research Triangle Park, NC, May 2, 2013.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Storytelling with Sources: Open Source Digital Humanities.” Paper presented at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, June 3, 2014.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Interactive Projection Mapping in the Museum: A Prototype.” Skidmore College. June 23, 2015 Olson, Mark J. V. “Digital Cultural Heritage as Public Humanities Collaboration.” Invited Panel Respondent. Annual Meeting of the College Art Association. Washington, DC. February 4, 2016.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Apostles, Arches, and Anatomical Models.” Public Panel Presentation. The Lives of Cities: New Technologies for Research, Presentation, Training, and Documentation. University of Padua, Italy. November 21, 2017.
  • Olson, Mark J. V. “Advancing Digital Art History through Emerging Computational Paradigms.” Panel Presentation. Annual Meeting of the College Art Association. New York, NY. February 13, 2019.
  • Olson, Mark J. V., and Caroline Bruzelius. “Learning by Making: Digital Methods and the Wired! Experiment at Duke University.” Paper presented at the Inaugural Lecture, Wesleyan Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, March 6, 2013.
  • Olson, Mark J. V., Elizabeth P. Baltes, Erica Sherman, and Victoria E. Szabo. “Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization.” Panel presented at the HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 2, 2011.
  • Szabo, Victoria E., Caroline Bruzelius, Maurizio Forte, Copper Frances Giloth, Louis P. Kaplan, Stefania Zardini Lacedelli, Radu Leon, Kerry Loewen, Diana Ndiaye, Mark J. V. Olson. “Digital Cultural Heritage as Public Humanities Collaboration.” Session organized at the College Art Association Conference, Washington, DC, February 4, 2016.
  • Szabo, Victoria E., Caroline Bruzelius, Maurizio Forte, Copper Frances Giloth, Louis P. Kaplan, Stefania Zardini Lacedelli, Radu Leon, Kerry Loewen, Diana Ndiaye, Mark J. V. Olson. “Digital Cultural Heritage as Public Humanities Collaboration.” Session organized at the College Art Association Conference, Washington, DC, February 4, 2016.

Dissertation & Theses

  • DeVeaux, Cyan. “SculptAR: Exploring the Potential of Participatory Augmented Reality and Virtual Experiences in the Contemporary Art Museum.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2020.
  • Hung, Ju-Yu. “Immersive Projection: A Case Study on the Duke Chapel Interior.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2018. Liu, Chang. “The Alife Bestiary: An AR Object Recognition Project on the Archivolt of Alife.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2019.

Paul Jaskot

Paul Jaskot

Director, Duke Digital Art History & Visual Culture Lab; Professor of Art History
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Paul B. Jaskot came to Duke in 2017 after many years of involvement with Digital Art History. He specializes in the history of modern German architecture and art, with a particular interest in the political history of architecture before, during, and after the Nazi era. He has also published on Holocaust Studies topics more broadly, modern architecture including the history of Chicago architecture, and methodological essays on Marxist art history. He has authored or edited several monographs and anthologies, including The Nazi Perpetrator: Postwar German Art and the Politics of the Right (University of Minnesota Press, 2012) and, as co-editor, New Approaches to an Integrated History of the Holocaust: Social History, Representation, Theory (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2018).

Paul has also been deeply involved in Digital Art History issues since 2007, both as a scholar and as an advocate. In this role, he has been part of the Holocaust Geography Collaborative, an international team of scholars that has been exploring the use of GIS and other digital methods to analyze central problems in the spatial history of the Holocaust, including issues rising from the built environment. He has worked most closely with Anne Kelly Knowles (University of Maine), co-authoring several presentations and essays with her, for example, as part of the anthology Geographies of the Holocaust (University of Indiana Press, 2014), the first volume on the use of GIS for the study of the Holocaust. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other sources. They are currently working on an Historical GIS of the Ghetto System in Nazi Occupied Europe along with their colleague Anika Walke (Washington University). The Wired! project teams of Mapping German Construction and Mapping Occupied Krakow extend and complement this work. With Wired!, Jaskot is also part of the Dictionary of Art Historians team, as well as the Visualizing Cities collaborative.

From 2008-2010, he was the President of the College Art Association (CAA). With CAA, he has also participated in various task forces promoting the support of and guidelines for Digital Art History and its professional evaluation. He continues to be active with CAA and with the promotion of Digital Art History initiatives nationally.

Current Collaborations

Dictionary of Art Historians

Scholarship

Articles

Anne Kelly Knowles, Paul B. Jaskot, Tim Cole, and Alberto Giordano with assistance from Maël Le Noc, Paul Rayson, and Ian Gregory, “Mind the Gap: Reading Across the Holocaust Testimonial Archive,” in Tim Cole and Simone Gigliotti, eds., Lessons & Legacies XIV (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2020): 216-41.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Digital Methods and the Historiography of Art.” In Kathryn Brown, ed., Digital Humanities and Art History (London: Routledge, 2020): 9-17.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Digital Art History as the Social History of Art: Towards the Disciplinary Relevance of Digital Methods.” Visual Resources 35, no. 1-2 (2019): 21-33. doi:10.1080/01973762.2019.1553651.

Jaskot, Paul B., Hannah L. Jacobs, Mark Olson, Victoria Szabo, and Edward Triplett. “Shaping the Discipline of Digital Art History: A recap of an advanced summer institute on 3-D and (geo)spatial networks.” The Iris. December 19, 2018. http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/shaping-the-discipline-of-digital-art-history/.

Jaskot, Paul B. and Ivo van der Graaff. “Historical Journals as Digital Sources: Mapping Architecture in Germany, 1914-24.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 76, no. 4 (December 2017): 483-505. doi:/10.1525/jsah.2017.76.4.483.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Commentary: Art-Historical Questions, Geographic Concepts, and Digital Methods,.” Historical Geography 45 (2017): 92-99.

Jaskot, Paul B. and Anne Kelly Knowles. “Architecture and Maps, Databases and Archives: An Approach to Institutional History and the Built Environment in Nazi Germany.” The Iris. February 15, 2017. http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/dah_jaskot_knowles/.

Presentations

Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. Presentation at “Coding Our Collection: Datathon,” National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, October 25, 2019.

Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. “Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks.” Panel presentations at the College Art Association Conference, New York, NY, February 13, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Digital Art History in the Moment of Barbarism: The Iconography of COVID-19.” Keynote for “Art History in Quarantine” (Virtual Conference), sponsored by the International Journal of Digital Art History. April 10, 2020.

Jaskot, Paul B. “The Scale of Architecture During the Holocaust: Digital Methods for Analyzing Building and Planning Goals in the German Occupation of the East (1939-1945).” Keynote for “Digital Humanities und das NS-Regime” (Conference), University of Bern, Switzerland, December 12, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B., et al. “Grand Challenges of Art History: Digital/Computational Methods and Social Art History.” Colloquium convened at The Clark, Williamstown, MA, April 27, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Visualizing Krakow under Nazi Occupation: Exploring Digital and Analog Methods to Analyze the Built Environment of the Holocaust.” Emory University, Atlanta, March 28, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B.“Visualizing Krakow under Nazi Occupation.” Society of Fellows in the Humanities, Columbia University, New York City, February 7, 2019.

Jaskot, Paul B. “A Plan, a Testimony, and a Digital Map: Analyzing the Architecture of the Holocaust.” Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto, Canada, March 12, 2018.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Scale and Ambiguity in the Digital Analysis of the Spaces of the Holocaust (or Why Bother Making an Art Historian a Member of Your Team).” Paper presented at the Research Computing Symposium, Duke University, Durham, NC, January 22, 2018.

Jaskot, Paul B., Anne Kelly Knowles, and Justus Hillebrand. “GIS and Corpus Linguistics: Mixed Digital Methods for the Exploration of Forced Labor in Krakow District Ghettos.” Paper presented at Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies, USC Shoah Foundation, Los Angeles, CA, October 23, 2017.

Jaskot, Paul B. “Using Digital Humanities to Understand the Architecture of the Holocaust.” Paper presented at the Digital Art History Lab Lecture Series, The Frick Collection, New York, NY, October 17, 2017.

Dissertations & Theses

Carrillo, Alan. “Modeling Ambiguity: An Analysis of the Paris Temple.” MA thesis, 2019. Halberstadt, Brittany. “Exiles and Abstract Expressionists: A Case Study of Influence with Analog and Digital Methods.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2020.

Leon, Emily. “Analyzing the Crisis of Hilma af Klint: The Digital and Analog Analysis of Spirituality, Abstraction, and Art.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2018.

Liu, Christine. “Mapping and Visualizing Testimonies of Spaces of Confinement: A Digital Analysis of the Kraków Ghetto.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2019.

Hannah Jacobs

Hannah L. Jacobs

Hannah L. Jacobs

Digital Humanities Specialist, Duke Digital Art History & Visual Culture Lab
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Hannah provides instruction and conducts research in digital concepts and tools for Wired! courses and projects. She leads tutorials and workshops, collaborates with faculty to develop and implement Digital Humanities projects in the classroom, consults on faculty research, offers advising on digital tools for undergraduate and Master’s student theses, provides technical support for lab projects, and liaises with other digital humanities staff at Duke.

Hannah holds an MA in Digital Humanities from King’s College London (2013) and a BA in English/Theatre from Warren Wilson College (2011). She is currently pursuing an MS in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2018-present). She is interested in challenges of conducting and representing historical research via data and visualization; project management in Digital Humanities; applications of digital technologies in Humanities pedagogies; and potentials of visual interactive storytelling for scholarly communications, public outreach, and education.

Scholarship

Books & Book Chapters

  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Kathryn Wymer, Victoria E. Szabo, and W. Russell Robinson. “A tale of two Durhams: how Duke University and North Carolina Central University are increasing access and building community through DH pedagogy.” In Debates in Digital Humanities Pedagogy, edited by Brian Croxall and Diane Jakacki. Minnesota, MN: University of Minnesota Press, forthcoming.

Public-Facing Scholarship

  • Jacobs, Hannah L., and Beth Fischer, eds. Visualizing Objects, Places, and Spaces: A Digital Project Handbook. https://handbook.pubpub.org/.

Articles

Presentations

  • Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Paper presented as part of the Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC, September 29, 2015.
  • Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Demonstration: Using a Neatline Syllabus in the Introductory Art History Survey.” Paper presented as part of the panel “Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology: ‘A Signature Pedagogy for Art History in the Twenty-First Century’” at the College Art Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C, February 3, 2016.
  • Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Wired! Full Immersion: Neatline and the Digital Syllabus.” Paper presented at Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous, Duke University, Durham, NC, March 19, 2015.
  • Holloway, Carson, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “DEVONthink.” Workshop presented at the DH Studio Workshop, Digital Scholarship Services, Duke University, Durham, NC, March 25, 2015.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Collaborative Teaching & Critical Digital Making in an Art History Classroom.” Paper presented at Digital Humanities 2016, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland, July 15, 2016. Jacobs, Hannah L., and Beth Fischer. “Visualizing Objects, Places, and Spaces: A Digital Project Handbook.” [Presentation & Workshop] Digital Humanities Collaborative Institute. University of North Carolina at Greensboro, March 5-6, 2020.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., and Beth Fisher. “Visualizing Objects, Places, and Spaces: A Digital Project Handbook.” Digital Humanities 2020, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, July 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/ahxm-9s52.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., and Victoria Szabo. “Digital Archiving & Storytelling in the Classroom with Omeka & CurateScape.” Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 12, 2016.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Annie Haueter, Julia Huang, and Timothy D. Shea. “Digital Curation in the Arts: Working with the Wired! Lab.” Presentation for the Duke Library Advisory Board, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 8, 2016.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Erica Hayes, and Nathan Kelber. “Project Management and DH.” Presentation at Digital Humanities Nuts and Bolts: From Idea to Sustainable Project, National Humanities Center, Research Triangle Park, NC, October 2, 2018.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. “Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks.” Panel presentations at the College Art Association Conference, New York, NY, February 13, 2019.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L., Paul Jaskot, Mark J. V. Olson, Victoria E. Szabo, and Edward Triplett. Presentation at “Coding Our Collection: Datathon,” National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, October 25, 2019.
  • Sorensen, Lee, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Updates from the Dictionary of Art Historians.” Presentation at the Art Historians’ Archives Workshop, Getty Research Institute, January 28, 2019.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Flipping the DH Workshop, or Rethinking How We Teach DH Tools.” Presentation at the Digital Scholarship Open House, Duke University, Durham, NC, February 21, 2019.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Points, Lines, Polygons, and Pixels: A Framework for Teaching & Learning Humanities Through Visualization.” Poster presented at Digital Humanities 2017: Access/Accés, Montreal, Canada, August 10, 2017.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Reflections on Uses of Spatiotemporal Visualization in a Humanities Classroom.” Visualization & Interactive Systems Friday Forum Speaking Series, Duke University, Durham, NC, October 16, 2015.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Roundtable: Setting Up a Digital Humanities Curriculum.” Presentation at the Renaissance Society of America, Toronto, Canada, March 19, 2019.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Teaching & Learning with Virtual Reality: Learn About It & Experience It!” Presentation for the Learn IT @ Lunch Seminar Series, Duke University, Durham, NC, September 9, 2015.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Toward a Framework for Project-Based Learning with Visual Storytelling.” Paper presented at HASTAC 2017: The Possible Worlds of Digital Humanities, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, November 4, 2017.
  • Jacobs, Hannah L. “Wired! Lab for Digital Art History & Visual Culture.” VIS4DH. October 25, 2020. https://vis4dh.dbvis.de/schedule/.

Dissertations & Theses

  • Carrillo, Alan. “Modeling Ambiguity: An Analysis of the Paris Temple.” MA thesis, 2019.
  • Leon, Emily. “Analyzing the Crisis of Hilma af Klint: The Digital and Analog Analysis of Spirituality, Abstraction, and Art.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2018.
  • Miers, Henrietta. “Mapping All Above: Sixteenth-Century Ceiling Painting in Venetian Churches at a Time of Religious Reform.” MA thesis, Duke University, 2015.

News

Kristin Huffman

Kristin Love Huffman

Kristin Love Huffman

Lecturing Fellow in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Kristin Love Huffman is a Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University. Her current research focuses on the uses, configurations, and, at times, deliberate re-ordering of architectural spaces and larger urban systems in early modern Venice. This is the central topic of her monograph: Visual Rhetoric and Spatial Dynamics in Early Modern Venice.

Her interest in urban experiences and reconstructing transformed or demolished spaces led her to work with Wired! at Duke as well as Visualizing Venice beginning in 2013. Within these collaboratives, she contributed to the curation of the exhibition, Water and Food in Venice at the Ducal Palace in 2015. From 2014-2017, she worked to create the exhibition, A Portrait of Venice: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of 1500 on display at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke (September 2017-January 2018). In conjunction with the exhibition, she organized a scholarly symposium, Stories about Venice and de’ Barbari’s Marvelous View of 1500. The research conducted for the exhibition, along with the talks first presented at the symposium, formed the foundation for an edited volume that includes over 20 scholarly essays related to the View of Venice and life in early modern Venice, A Portrait of Venice: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s Venice (Duke University Press, forthcoming 2021). She is currently working with colleagues at the Correr Museum in Venice, Italy, to feature an expanded version of the 2017-2018 exhibition, A Portrait of Venice, as an installation centered on the woodcut along with the original wooden blocks used to publish the View in 1500. The high-resolution image, the best available for in-depth study and analysis, was developed in collaboration with Duke Libraries and can be found here: 10.7924/G8MK69TH

Most recently, she collaborated with Duke Library’s Rubenstein Library for an interactive virtual exhibition featuring digital stories related to the map of Venice by Ludovico Ughi, first printed in 1729. The exhibition, The Senses of Venice, was co-curated with Bradford Lewis, and included significant contributions from four undergraduate students: Noah Michaud, Angela Tawfik, Daphne Turan, and Mary Kate Weggeland, with animations developed in collaboration with CamerAnebbia, colleagues at the School of Architecture at the University of Padua, as well as those closer to home, namely Hannah L. Jacobs and Dave Zielinski.

Within the Wired! Lab, in addition to developing research projects and exhibitions, she works alongside Paul B. Jaskot and Hannah L. Jacobs to develop new curricular strategies and innovative learning opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students.

For her research and digital projects, she has been awarded grants from the following institutions: The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, The National Endowment for the Humanities, The Renaissance Society of America, The Samuel H. Kress Foundation, The Furthermore Foundation.

Past Collaborations

Mapping Stereotomy

Scholarship

Books & Book Chapters

Huffman, Kristin Love., Andrea Giordano, and Caroline Bruzelius, eds. Visualizing Venice: Mapping and Modeling Time and Change in a City. New York: Routledge, 2019.

Huffman, Kristin Love., “Digital Art History: Building a Model for Student Engagement” in Visualizing Venice: Mapping and Modeling Time and Change in a City, eds. Kristin Love. Huffman, Caroline Bruzelius, and Andrea Giordano. New York: Routledge Press, 2018: 111-117.

Huffman, Kristin Love., “Visualizing Venice to Visualizing Cities: Future Horizons” in Visualizing Venice: Mapping and Modeling Time and Change in a City, eds. Kristin Love. Huffman, Caroline Bruzelius, and Andrea Giordano. New York: Routledge Press, 2018: xii-xiv.

Huffman, Kristin Love., “Banquets, Parades, Games and Festivals,” in Acqua e Cibo (Water and Food): storie della laguna e della città, eds. Donatella Calabi and Ludovica Galeazzo. Venice: Marsilio, 2015: 184-89.

Huffman, Kristin Love. Twelve Catalogue Entries in Acqua e Cibo (Water and Food): storie della laguna e della città, eds. Donatella Calabi and Ludovica Galeazzo. Venice: Marsilio, 2015: 190-193; 196-204; 207.

Huffman, Kristin Love, A Portrait of Venice. Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of 1500. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2021.

Public-Facing Scholarship

Huffman, Kristin Love. Senses of Venice. Duke University Libraries, August 26, 2019-December 15, 2019.

Huffman, Kristin Love. A Portrait of Venice: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of 1500. Nasher Museum of Art, September 7, 2017-December 31, 2017.

Huffman, Kristin Love. Acqua e Cibo: Storie della Città e della laguna (Water and Food: Stories of Venice and the Lagoon). Ducal Palace, Venice, Italy, September 2015-February 2016.

Articles

Huffman, Kristin Love. “Jacopo De’ Barbari’s View of Venice (1500) ‘Image Vehicles’ and ‘Pathways of Culture’ Past and Present.” Mediterranea. International Journal on the Transfer of Knowledge 4 (2019): 165-214. doi:10.21071/mijtk.v4i0.11530.

Huffman, Kristin Love. and Andrea Giordano, eds. DISEGNARECON, 11, no 21 (2018, but released 2019). Special edition entitled, “Advanced Technologies for Historical Cities Visualization.” ISSN 1828 5961.

Huffman, Kristin Love, and Iara Dundas. “San Geminiano: ‘A Ruby among Many Pearls.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 79, no. 1 (2020): 6-16. doi:10.1525/jsah.2020.79.1.6.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman, Mark James-Vrooman Olson, and Victoria E. Szabo. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin 4, no. 1 (2015): Article 3.

Presentations

Huffman, Kristin Love. “500-Year-Old Wooden Blocks, Light Laser Scans & Photogrammetry.” Paper presented at Digital Matters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 6-7, 2018.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “A ‘Virtually’ Digital Exhibition.” University of Padua, Italy, 2017.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “A Portrait of a City: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s Venice.” Florida State University, 2019. Huffman, Kristin Love. “A Portrait of Venice.” University of Kansas, 2017.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “A View from Above: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s Venice.” Ballroom of the Correr Museum, 2018. Huffman, Kristin Love. “Digital Humanities and Historic Visualization.” University of Padua, Italy, 2016.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of Venice.” University of Washington at St. Louis, 2017. Huffman, Kristin Love. “The View of Venice and the Making of Knowledge.” University of Padova, 2018.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “The View of Venice.” School of Engineering, Duke University, 2017.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “The Wooden Blocks of Jacopo de’ Barbari’s Celebrated View of Venice.” Renaissance Society of America, New Orleans, March 2018.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “Virtual Reconstructions in between the Ephemeral and the Virtual: Reactivating Art Installations through Digital Reconstructions.” College Art Association, Washington D.C., 2016.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “Visualizing Venetian Art.” Wake Forest University, Digital Humanities, 2016. Huffman, Kristin Love. “Wired! & Visualizing Venice.” College Art Association, Chicago, February 2014.

Huffman, Kristin Love. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Temple, Philadelphia, PA, 2014.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman, and Victoria E. Szabo. “Wired! Approaches to Digital Scholarship.” Paper presented at Symposium on Digital Cultures, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA, October 21, 2014.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman. “Visualizing Venice: Digital Tools & Urban History,” Berlin, Germany, March 2015.

Olga Grlic

Olga Grlic

Olga Grlic

Senior Research Scholar
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Olga Grlic is a Project Manager for The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database. She received her MA and PhD degrees in Comparative Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Her undergraduate degrees were in French and Spanish from University of Zagreb, Croatia. From 2014 to 2016 she was Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has published on Dante and made numerous translations from French to English. Her interest in the Norman Kingdom of Sicily arose from working on representations of castles in chivalric literature in Old French, and on cultural contacts between Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Crusader states in the twelfth century.

Scholarship

Dissertations & Theses

  • Williams, Jessica Caitlin. “Robert Willis (1800-1875) and the Historiography of Italian Gothic Architecture.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2019.

Sara Galletti

Sara Galletti

Sara Galletti

Associate Professor of Art History
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Sara Galletti is an Associate Professor of Art and Architectural History. She received a joint PhD in the History of Architecture and Urbanism from the Université de Paris IV–Sorbonne and the Università IUAV of Venice. Her main field of research and teaching is the history and theory of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century architecture in France. Her first book, Le Palais du Luxembourg de Marie de Médicis, 1611-1631, was published by Éditions Picard (Paris, 2012). She is currently working on two projects: (1) Practice into Theory: Philibert Delorme, the Premier Tome de l’Architecture (1567), and the Profession of Architecture in Early Modern France, which analyses the connections between architectural theory and practice in fifteenth- to seventeenth-century France; and (2) Paris of Waters, which focuses on the impact of water on the demographic, social, architectural, and urban development of the city of Paris through time.

Scholarship

Articles

  • Galletti, Sara. “Paired Models: Comparing Domestic Typologies Between Italy and France.” Digital Serlio – Scholars’ Essays. 2018. https://library.columbia.edu/libraries/avery/digitalserlio/essays.html.
  • Galletti, Sara. “Philibert de L’Orme’s theory of stereotomy in the Premier tome de l’architecture.” Thinking3D. April 16, 2018. https://www.thinking3d.ac.uk/deL’Orme1567/.
  • Galletti, Sara. “Stereotomy and the Mediterranean: Notes Toward an Architectural History.” Mediterranea. International Journal on the Transfer of Knowledge 2 (2016): 73-120. doi:10.21071/mijtk.v0i2.6716.

Presentations

  • Galletti, Sara. “Mapping Stereotomy: Vaulting in the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean.” Paper presented at Digital Matters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Duke University, Durham, NC. April 6-7, 2018.
  • Galletti, Sara. “Paris of Waters.” Institut français d’archéologie orientale (IFAO). Cairo, Egypt. May 3, 2019
  • Galletti, Sara. “Paris of Waters.” John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Duke University. February 7, 2019.
  • Galletti, Sara. “Stereotomy: A Mediterranean History.” Society of Architectural Historians, Annual International Conference. April 18, 2018 – April 22, 2018
  • Galletti, Sara. “Stereotomy: a Mediterranean History.” Vanderbilt University. October 29, 2018

Dissertations & Theses

  • Calmar, Margarete McCormick. “Libyan Architecture through the Lens of European Travelers.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2019.
  • Wiegers, Hanna. “The Dominican Convent of Saint Jacques in Paris: Origins and Development.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2016.
  • Wolfe, Hannah Elizabeth. “Mapping Stereotomy from Cairo to al-Andalus.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2019.

Funding & Sponsorships

Sheila Dillon

Sheila Dillon

Sheila Dillon

Professor of Art History and Classical Studies
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Sheila Dillon received a PhD in Classical Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She teaches courses on Greek and Graeco-Roman art and archaeology. Her research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Professor Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current research includes a collaborative project to publish the portrait sculpture from the Excavations in the Athenian Agora with a group of current and former students, and a digital mapping project of the history of the archaeological excavations in the Agora, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke. Professor Dillon was the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology from 2013-2016.

Scholarship

Books & Book Chapters

  • Dillon, Sheila, and Timothy D. Shea. “Statues as Artifacts: Towards an Archaeology of Greek Sculpture.” In Greek Art In Context: Archaeological and Art Historical Perspective, edited by Diana Rodríguez Perez. New York: Routledge, 2017.

Digital Scholarship

Articles

  • Dillon, Sheila , and Elizabeth Palmer Baltes. “Honorific Practices and the Politics of Space on Hellenistic Delos.” American Journal of Archaeology 117, no. 2 (2013): 207-46. doi:10.3764/aja.117.2.0207.

Presentations

  • Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials,” Paper presented at C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, February 17, 2010.

Dissertations & Theses

  • Baltes, Elizabeth P. “Dedication and Display of Portrait Statues in Hellenistic Greece: Spatial Practices and Identity Politics.” PhD diss., Duke University, 2016.
  • Shea, Timothy David. “Mapping Immigrant Communities Through Their Tombstones in Archaic and Classical Athens.” PhD diss., Duke University, 2018.
  • Trahey, Tara M. “Visualizing an Iconographic Network Between Athens and Vulci in the 6th Century B.C.E.” Undergraduate thesis, Duke University, 2015.