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Architectural History of Medieval Iberia

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Architectural History of Medieval Iberia

Instructor(s): Edward Triplett

This course will explore the production of cross-cultural interaction in the regions of Spain and Portugal during the 8th through the 15th centuries, with particular attention devoted to Christian and Muslim relationships. Students will discuss a variety of topics, including the concept of “Moorish,” “Mudejar,” “Reconquest” and “Spanish Gothic” architecture through weekly readings and visual analysis of churches, mosques, synagogues, monasteries, castles, and palaces. Final projects will include a research paper as well as a visualization (via mapping or 3D modeling techniques taught by the instructor) on a topic of the students’ choice.

Course Code(s): ARTHIST 590S

Curriculum Code(s): Seminar

Day(s) & Times(s): W 12:00pm – 2:30pm

Location: Smithwarehouse Bay 11 Room A233 | WiredLab

Chicago: Architecture, Urbanism, Politics

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Chicago: Architecture, Urbanism, Politics

Instructor(s): Paul Jaskot

Building has often been at the center of major social, economic and political struggles of the modern era. This course will analyze the development of architecture and urbanism in Chicago, from its incorporation to the present day, in relation to these historical struggles. Focusing particularly on the concept of place and space, the course will give the student an overview of building in Chicago and analyze in detail the theories and practices which govern urban planning up to our own times. Select sections of the course will particularly emphasize Chicago 1920-1975, and how questions of class and race intersect with a political economy of architecture.

Course Code(s): ARTHIST 339

Curriculum Code(s): CCI, ALP, CZ

Day(s) & Times(s): Th 12:00pm – 2:30pm

Location: Smith Warehouse Bay 9 A290

Introduction to Digital Humanities

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Introduction to Digital Humanities

Instructor(s): Hannah L. Jacobs

Digital approaches to humanistic research and its expression, across disciplines and fields. Critical approaches to the digital turn in contemporary culture; theoretical approaches to digital creation and digital remediation of analog sources. Topics include aesthetics, cultural impact, opportunities for global circulation. Critical contextualization around access, authorship, diversity, and inclusion, media effects, and evaluation. Exercises in text analysis, digital mapping, data visualization, databases, networks, online archives and exhibitions, immersive media, situated within broader cultural debates on digital cultures, and on best practices for interdisciplinary collaboration.

Course Code(s): CMAC 222D

Curriculum Code(s): STS, ALP, CZ

Day(s) & Times(s): MW 10:15am-11:30am

Location: Smith Warehouse Bay 11 A233

Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

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Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Instructor(s): Augustus Wendell

2D and 3D imaging, modeling; raster and vector graphics sources, laser scanners, photogrammetric software, basic database structures. Digital mapping and GIS. Presentation strategies and best practices for the web (standards-compliant HTML/CSS/Javascript), multimedia (audio/video/animation), scholarly annotation, intellectual property. Theoretical, ethical issues in field of new media and digital humanities. Epistemological issues re: mediation and visualization, ethics of intellectual property, politics of geospatial visualization, digital materiality, affordances of new media narrativity.

Course Code(s): CMAC 581S, HCVIS 581S, ISS 581S

Curriculum Code(s): STS, ALP

Day(s) & Times(s): M 12:00pm-2:30pm

Location: Smith Warehouse Bay 11 A233 | WiredLab

Digital Durham

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Digital Durham

The Digital Durham seminar is based on the idea that understanding the past is a civic virtue. The course fosters awareness of the complexity of Durham communities, including the interconnections of the white and African-American communities in the past. The project lays bare Durham’s experience of industrialization, immigration, segregation, and urbanization and demonstrates how that history shapes the present and the future. Students will engage with a broad array of primary sources in the Rubenstein Library including maps, photographs, census data, and handwritten letters from the nineteenth century–and digital tools which they will use to share and interpret historical documents.

Course Code(s): CMAC 758S, VMS 358S

Curriculum Code(s): R, ALP

Day(s) & Times(s): W 10:15-12:35

Location: Rubenstein 150

Gothic Cathedrals

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Gothic Cathedrals

Instructor(s): Edward Triplett

This course introduces students to the history and design of cathedrals and monasteries in medieval Europe. Themes include the development of Gothic architecture from Romanesque foundations in France, the importance of fractions and Euclidean geometry for medieval architects, and the material and financial costs of monumental construction projects during the middle ages. In addition to lectures and discussions, students will design a counterfactual monastery or cathedral using 3D graphics software as part of a final project. In-class tutorials will teach students how to draw plans, elevations, and sections of churches and monastic buildings and how to build 3D models from these drawings.

Course Code(s): ARTHIST 225

Curriculum Code(s): CCI, R, ALP, CZ

Day(s) & Times(s): MW 3:30pm – 4:45pm

Location: Smith Warehouse Bay 11 Room A233 | WiredLab

First-Year Seminar: Visual Culture of Venice

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First-Year Seminar: Visual Culture of Venice

Instructor(s): Kristin Love Huffman

Venice was one of the wealthiest and most powerful states in the Early Modern world (1450-1600). A city whose curved urban form seemingly floated on water, it was experienced, lived, and navigated unlike any in the world. This Wired! course entails an extensive analysis of the urban and natural topography of Venice in the Early Modern period, and it investigates the artistic commissions that made the city into one of the most admired and well-visited destinations in the world. The research component of the course will be a consideration of Venice as it appeared through the eyes of the early modern tourist, or foreign visitor to the city with visual itineraries that may be shared with a larger academic community. The course assumes no prior art historical or digital experience; students will be provided with the background necessary to understand the art and architectural history of early modern Venice, and the skills required for the digital technology.

Prerequisite: First year, First year with exception or Transfer students only.

Course Code(s): ARTHIST 89S | VMS 89S

Curriculum Code(s): Seminar

Day(s) & Times(s): TH 12:00pm-2:30pm

Location: Smith Warehouse Bay 11 A233 (Wired! Lab)

Digitally annotated medieval city view. Image credit: Edward Triplett

Visualizing Cities

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Visualizing Cities

Representing Urban Landscapes, Cultures, and Environments

Visualizing cities in theory and practice. Exploring digital and visual representation of landscapes, structures, environments, history, culture, architecture, events, and populations. Change over time, cultural heritage, possible futures, and alternate pasts from historical, cultural, documentary, and scientific evidence and archives. The idea of the city as a conceptual category and metaphor. Ubiquitous computing in urban environments as a medium for interaction. Global cities and diaspora. Visual imagery and written accounts. Use of mapping, imaging, 3D, augmented reality, games. Individual and group research and production of visualizing cities projects. Topics and temporal foci vary.

Course Code(s): F 12:00-2:30PM

Curriculum Code(s): Online

Day(s) & Times(s): Spring 2021

Location: Spring 2021

Digital Durham

Digital Durham

The Digital Durham seminar is based on the idea that understanding the
past is a civic virtue. The course fosters awareness of the complexity
of Durham communities, including the interconnections of the white and
African-American communities in the past. The project lays bare
Durham’s experience of industrialization, immigration, segregation,
and urbanization and demonstrates how that history shapes the present
and the future. Students will engage with a broad array of primary
sources in the Rubenstein Library including maps, photographs, census
data and handwritten letters from the nineteenth century–and digital
tools which they will use to share and interpret historical documents.

Course Attributes:

Seminar
(R) Research
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
(W) Writing
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance

This course was part of a Bass Connections 2017-18 project.

Image Credit

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The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Athens

The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Athens

Athens was one of the great cities of antiquity.  As the place in which democracy, philosophy, and the theater were born, it is foundational for understanding much of the development of the western world. With its unusually rich surviving material and literary record, it forms an ideal setting in which to explore relationships of ancient to modern, landscape to built-scape, material to literary record amongst others.  This course, team-taught by professors at both Duke University and The American College of Greece-Deree, will use the Classical through Roman visible physical remains of Athens as a focus to explore the changing face of the city through in-class and cross-continent reading and debate, digital creation and on-site exploration.  Teamwork between students in Greece and the US will be a major component of the course. Students will learn to manage and present information with Omeka and Neatline.

NB: The course includes a mandatory, full-funded trip to Athens during Spring Break. The enrollment cap is therefore set to 10. Preference will be given to sophomores and juniors, and to those students interested in learning digital visualization tools.

Students on site, spring break 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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