Decoding Artifacts. Image Credit: Jessica Pissini & Simon Verity
Decoding Artifacts. Image Credit: Jessica Pissini & Simon Verity

Decoding Artifacts

Project Lead(s): Jessica Pissini, Caroline Bruzelius

Spring 2015Fall 2015

MA in Digital Art History student Jessica Pissini (’15) completed this project as part of her master’s thesis. Below is her explanation of her work:

The Decoding Artifacts project researched medieval sculpture by studying stone carving tools and marks, the relationship of sound to the sculptor’s technique, and the importance of drawings and their connections to geometry. In addition, the project’s team is exploring ways to use digital tools and applications for public outreach and education within the Nasher Museum of Art. The website and augmented by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, this augmented reality museum app presents 3D models, educational videos, and images as instruments of learning about stone carving and the artifact’s history. It encourages visitors to interact with the museum objects while exploring the virtual information and visualizations.

A walk through of the project website and its videos.

Jessica’s project was connected to a larger reconstruction project in which sculptor Simon Verity produced a reconstructed Head of a Virtual using medieval carving techniques. View a model of his work below: